RESEARCH ARTICLE


Acute Glomerular Diseases in Children



Kanwal K. Kher*
Division of Nephrology, Children's National Medical Center, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Healthy Sciences, Washington, DC, USA


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Creative Commons License
© Kanwal K. Kher ; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at The Division of Nephrology, Children's National Medical Center, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA; Tel: 202- 476-5058; Fax: 202-476-3475; E-mail: kkher@childrensnational.org


Abstract

Glomerulonephritis [GN] is one of the common acquired pediatric renal disorders encountered in clinical practice. The clinical manifestations include gross or microscopic hematuria, proteinuria, and nephrotic syndrome. Renal dysfunction and hypertension may also be present in many patients. Etiopathogenesis of GN can be idiopathic in a large majority, while some may result from infections or known immune disorders. Several of these disorders are now believed to arise from dysfunctions of podocytes and are grouped under the heading of “podocytopathies”. This review focuses on the clinical manifestations and management of the common forms of acute GN encountered in children.

Keywords: Acute post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis, Glomerulonephritis, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, IgA nephropathy, lupus nephritis. .